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49 sounds

Audio and sounds files

Jupiter, saturn and their moons

Here are audio files related to the activity of Jupiter, Saturn, and their satellites. They were recorded on HF bands as well as by plasma wave detectors (magnetometers) onboard spacecrafts visiting the giant planets.

You will find on this page QSOs worked by radio amateurs as well as the sound of different transmission modes that you can hear on shortwaves and recordings of historical events.

You will find on this page recordings related to astronautic events, transmissions from satellite and other spacecrafts, as well as reports from astronauts and cosmonauts on orbit.

Check also my animations for hundreds other videos and films.

FormatsWAVMP3 RAM MPEG AVI QT MID WMA

Menu - Meteor Showers - Auroral and related activity - Geomagnetosphere activity

Solar activity - Jupiter, its satellites, Saturn - Pulsars - Miscellaneous Natural

Jupiter

1.2 MB

Voyager 1 crossing Jupiter's Bow shock. The bow shock is nature's way of slowing, deflecting, and heating the solar wind as it runs into an object, in this case the Jovian magnetosphere. Explanations

 2 MB

Jovian bow shock recorded by Voyager 1 in 1979. Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group.

900 KB

Voyager 2 passing through Jupiter outer magnetosphere

169 KB

Lightning in Jupiter's atmosphere recorded by plasma wave instrument onboard Voyager's spaceprobes

361 KB

Jovian whistlers. These sounds are audio frequency electromagnetic waves produced by lightning in the upper atmosphere of Jupiter. Once produced, these waves travel along closed magnetic field lines from one hemisphere to the other in the right-hand polarized, whistler mode of propagation. Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group.

 1.3 MB

Jovian chorus. Chorus emissions are electromagnetic widebands emissions propagating in the right-hand polarized whistler mode. They are among the most intense plasma waves in the outer magnetosphere of Jupiter. Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group.

216 KB

Jupiter hiss recording at 25.55 and 25.67 MHz by Alta´r.

1.9 MB

Jupiter tweeks recorded by the Cassini space probe in 2001. Document JPL

3.3 MB

Jupiter activity recorded at 20.1 and 21.2 MHz with a loop antenna on July 13, 1999 by Radio Jove Team at Greenbank, WV.

261 KB

Mix of L-burst and Io B-storm recorded at 20 MHz on March 10, 2002 by Radiosky

474 KB

Mix of S-burst and Io B-storm recorded at 20 MHz on March 10, 2002 by Radiosky

3.9 MB

Mix of Jupiter sound and Io B-storm recorded in stereo, at 22 MHz for the left channel, at 23 MHz for the right channel on March 3, 2002 by Thomas Ashcraft

352 KB

Mix of Jupiter C-activity and Io B-storm recorded on September 22, 2000 at 1240 UTC by WCC Hawaii

792 KB

Mix of Jupiter S-burst and Io B-storm recorded in stereo, at 21 MHz for the left channel, at 22 MHz for the right channel on September 9, 2000 by Thomas Ashcraft

331 KB

Jupiter L-burst during Jupiter storm, February 23, 2004 at 0834 UTC (0434 a.m. local time). Recorded by Thierry Lombry at 28-32 MHz using the receiver and antennas (Log-spiral "tee-pee" and Yagis) from University of Florida Radio Observatory (UFRO) connected to the Internet. Sampling at 44100 kHz, Stereo, 128 Kbps. Signal peak at -34.8 dB, or 35 times more powerful than the background hash (about -50 dB) !

803 KB

Jupiter L-burst during Jupiter storm, February 23, 2004 at 0810 UTC. Same conditions as previous. Signal peak at -38.3 dB

1 MB

Jupiter L-burst during Jupiter storm, February 23, 2004 at 0808 UTC. Same conditions as previous. Signal peak at -38 dB

925 KB

Jupiter L-burst during Jupiter storm, February 23, 2004 at 0802 UTC. Same conditions as previous. Signal peak at -35.2 dB

798 KB

Jupiter L-burst during Jupiter storm, February 23, 2004 at 0801 UTC. Same conditions as previous. Signal peak at -37.9 dB

586 KB

Jupiter L-burst during Jupiter storm, February 23, 2004 at 0754 UTC. Same conditions as previous. Signal peak at -38.2 dB

1.1 MB

Jupiter L-burst during Jupiter storm, February 23, 2004 at 0741 UTC Same conditions as previous. Signal peak at -34.6 dB

901 KB

Jupiter L-burst during Jupiter storm, February 23, 2004 at 0738 UTC. Same conditions as previous. Very powerful signal peaking at -33.3 dB

276 KB

Jupiter S-burst during Jupiter storm, February 22, 2004 at 0605 UTC. Same conditions as previous. Signal peak at -42 dB

727 KB

Jupiter S-bursts recorded on september 30, 2000 at 1419.5 UTC by WCC Hawaii

2.7 MB

Mixed of Jupiter S-bursts and Io B-storm recorded in stereo (shift of 300 kHz) by Thomas Ashcraft

195 KB

Jupiter S-burst recorded at 20.1 MHz by Thomas Ashcraft

1.1 MB

Mixed of Jupiter L-burst and Io B-storm recorded in stereo on March 7, 2001 at 0247 UTC by Thomas Ashcraft

406 KB

Jupiter L-burst in front of galactic radiation, recorded at UFRO

477 KB

Jupiter L-burst, recorded at UFRO

491 KB

Jupiter S-burst in front of galactic radiation, recorded at UFRO

588 KB

Jupiter S-burst, recorded at very low speed and rerun at high speed (128x), UFRO

291 KB

Jovian upstream ion acoustic waves. Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group.

632 KB

Jovian electron cyclotron emission. Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group.

Jovian satellites

1.3 MB

Plasma waves emitted by Ganymede magnetosphere discovered in 1996 by Galileo spaceprobe. The waveform has been played back at about a factor of 10 slower since the original recording had a bandwidth of 80 kHz and the human ear can only hear sounds up to about 10 or 20 kHz.

856 KB

Europa plasma waves, same recording conditions as previous. Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group.

478 KB

Callisto plasma waves, same recording conditions as previous. Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group.

3.8 MB

Ganymede plasma waves, same recording conditions as previous but with spectral analysis. Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group.

Saturn and its satellites

1.7 MB

Recording of Saturn radio emissions monitored by the Cassini spacecraft. The radio waves are closely related to the auroras near the poles of the planet. Time on this recording has been compressed, so that 73 seconds corresponds to 27 minutes. Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group

435 KB

Recording of an intense lightning storm developing over the equatorial region of Saturn on January 16, 2006 between 23-01h TU. The time was compressed by a factor of about 260. That is, this 28 second clip represents two hours of Cassini observations. The actual occurrence rate of the flashes during the peak of this storm is about one every two seconds. The crackles you hear are akin to the crackles that you can hear on a AM radio (0.5-3 MHz) during a thunderstorm on Earth. It was recorded by the radio and plasma instrument (RPWS) onboard Cassini spacecraft on frequencies between 2-16 MHz. According to scientists, such radio bursts are perhaps 1000 times stronger than terrestrial lightnings ! Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group

542 KB

Cassini spacecraft crossing Saturn ring plane between rings A and F (external) on the sun side. It is the inbound, i.e. from down to up to the "inside". Here are detail of the trajectory. What we hear are impacts of small dust particles on the spacecraft. The relative speed between the dust particles and Cassini during these times is about 16 km/s. When the dust hits Cassini, there is sufficient kinetic energy released that the dust particle and even a tiny part of Cassini  is vaporized, creating a gas with a temperature of order 100,000░C.  This is sufficient to ionize at least part of the gas and, subsequently, the expanding cloud of ionized gas (plasma) induces a signal that can be recorded by Cassini antennas. This rapidly expanding plasma cloud was detected in a band of frequencies from a few Hz to 10 kHz. As far as the difference between the inbound and outbound recording (see below), the primary difference is that the impact rate was higher outbound than inbound. Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group.

572 KB

Cassini spacecraft crossing Saturn ring plane between rings A and F (external) on the sun side. It is the outbound, i.e. from up to down to the "outside". Here are detail of the trajectory. Sale explanation as previous recording. Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group.

241 KB

The sound of Saturn rotation. These signals were recorded over a five day interval, from 2-7 June 2004 during Cassini-Huygens approach to Saturn. These low frequencies radio emissions called Saturn Kilometric Radiation (SKR) are generated by charged particles whose motions are controlled by the planetary magnetic field. It was recorded over the South pole open field force of Saturn. This recording made at frequencies ranging from 100 to 300 kHz were shifted down to 0-3 kHz and speeding up the recording so that 1 second corresponds to one rotation. The average rotation period obtained this way is 10 hr 45 min 45 ▒ 36 sec, or 6 minutes longer that during Voyager flybys of Saturn. Document U.Iowa/RPWS Group.

678 KB

Cassini's magnetometer instrument detected an atmosphere around Enceladus during the Feb. 17, 2005, flyby and again during a March 9, 2005, flyby. This audio file is based on the data collected from that instrument.

Ion cyclotron waves are organized fluctuations in the magnetic field that provide information on what ions are present. Cassini's magnetometer detected the presence of these waves in the vicinity of Saturn's moon Enceladus. This audio file shows the power of these waves near Enceladus. Document NASA/JPL.

378 KB

The sound of Titan recorded by the microphone (ACU) fixed on Huygens spaceprobe on Jan 14, 2005 from early in the descent through the atmosphere. The record was played back at the actual rate at which the data were recorded. Some event during the descent causes an amplitude (loudness) increase in the recorded sound. Document ESA and The Planetary Society

444 KB

The sound of Titan recorded during the descent of Huygens spaceprobe on Jan 14, 2005 by the ACU. We hear a lot of acoustic noises. Document ESA and The Planetary Society

439 KB

By comparison, the sound of the wind recorded on Earth with the ACU during the descent of a test ballon and played back at realtime.We hear a combination of wind and microphone system noise. Document ESA and The Planetary Society

432 KB

The sound of Titan recorded the descent of Huygens spaceprobe on Jan 14, 2005. This is a reconstruction of a signal generated by the Huygens radar altimeter. We hear a "blanking signal" until the radar achieves a "lock," which means that the radar signal returned from the surface was detected and exceeded a pre-defined signal-to-noise level. Higher is the pich closer is the surface. A very exciting recording. Document ESA and The Planetary Society

728 KB

This sound sample overlaps the landing of Huygens on Jan 14, 2005, at which point all becomes much more quiet. The landing occurs as a slow fade of sound rather than a sharp "thud" because of the 2-second, or lower, resolution of the sound data, and because Delory's sound processing algorithm is designed to smooth amplitude jumps in the acoustic sensor data. Document ESA and The Planetary Society

253 KB

The sound of Titan recorded after the landing of Huygens on Jan 14, 2005. Document ESA and The Planetary Society

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