V1 - V2 - V3 - V4
Open
Names NGC 2261, Hubble's Variable Nebula
Right Ascension (2000.0) 06:39:09.5
Declination +08:44:40
Constellation Monoceros
Redshift (z) ...
Heliocentric Radial Velocity ...
Distance (esteem) 2,500 light years
Date (DD/MM/YYYY) 18/01/2010
Exposure time 6,000 seconds (20 x 300 exposures) with binning mode 2 x 2
CCD Camera SBIG ST-8XE
Telescope Meade Instruments Schmidt-Cassegrain 14" LX200 GPS
Focal length 3556 mm
Diameter 355.6 mm
Focal ratio 10
Field of View 13.3 x 8.9 arcminute
Original scale 1.044 arcsecond / pixel

Palomar Observatory Sky Survey images
POSS I/E DSS1 Red
POSS I/O DSS2 Blue
POSS II/F DSS2 Red
POSS II/J DSS2 Blue
POSS II Color
Sloan Digital Sky Survey images
SDSS image
0.9-meter telescope Kitt Peak National Observatory image (1968)
KPNO

Comments
Here you can see the famous Hale Telescope's first light picture taken by Edwin Hubble on January 26, 1949. It was a 15 minute exposure under poor seeing conditions that account for the large size of the stars.
While studying my picture, on January 22 2010, I noticed that the star USNO-A2.0 0975-03605809 has changed its position in respect of POSS I plates. I collected images from various sources back to the twenties (Mount Wilson 100-inch) to the more recent SDSS and can confirm the proper motion of this star. It's easily recognizable confronting POSS I and POSS II images. The coordinates in the original USNO-A2 catalogue (epoch 1953.940) are:
R.A. 06:39:05.689 Dec +0845'40.77" (J2000).
Measuring the actual coordinates from my image I obtained:
R.A. 06:39:05.740 Dec +0845'29.40" (J2000).
The movement seems to be approximately from North to South and is about 11.37" in 57 years. This yields a proper motion of approximately 0.2" per year. The name is NLTT 16798 and is listed as High Proper Motion Star.
Return