Sign in to follow this  
jackbauer 2

LBT (Large Binocular Telescope) : First light !

Recommended Posts

Advertising
By registering on Astrosurf,
this type of ad will no longer be displayed.
Planetary Astronomy
Observing, imaging and studying the planets
A comprehensive book about observing, imaging, and studying planets. It has been written by seven authors, all being skillful amateur observers in their respective domains.
More information on www.planetary-astronomy.com

Impressionnant et génial, mais où sont les miroirs secondaires?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
quelques infos :

Telescope Information
The Large Binocular Telescope uses an elevation over an azimuth mounting. The elevation optical support structure moves on two large C-shaped rings and the compact azimuth platform transmits the loads directly down to the pier. The two 8.4 meter (331 inch) diameter primary mirrors are mounted with a 14.4 meter center-center separation. By using swing arms to rotate the secondary mirrors and their supports, it is possible to switch the telescope from one mode of observation to another very quickly. The short focal length of the primary mirrors (F/1.142) permits a compact, and therefore quite stiff telescope structure. Following are some of the characteristics of the telescope structure:

œ Telescope Structure: model A', platform design
œ Support Spacing: 2 "C'' rings on 10 meter centers
œ Pier Diameter: 13 meters for azimuth track
œ Telescope Height: ~ 25 meters at elevation axis (30 m above bedrock)
œ Building Height: ~ 40 meters at roofline
œ Support of Telescope: hydrostatic pads
œ Drive Mechanism: gear and pinion
œ Telescope and Drive Stiffness Goal: locked rotor frequency > 8 Hz
œ Vibration Specification: < 0.025 m amplitude above 8 Hz
œ Encoders: strip type
œ Telescope Moment of Inertia: approximately 1.0*107 Kg m2 (both axes)
œ Telescope Mass: approximately 580 metric tons
œ Maximum Angular Speed: 1.5 degrees/second
œ Maximum Angular Acceleration: 0.3 degrees/second2
œ Maximum Angular Acceleration: 0.3 degrees/second2
œ Error Budget: telescope and optics to match r0 = 45 cm atmosphere
œ Implied Image Size from Telescope = 0.22 arcsecond FWHM
œ Short Term Tracking Specification: 0.03 arcsecond rms motion (5 seconds)
œ Whole Sky Pointing Specification: 0.3 arcsecond rms
œ Wind Speed for Pointing and Tracking Specs: 24 km/hr
œ Maximum Operating Wind Speed: 80 km/hr
œ Survival Wind Speed (closed): 225 km/hr
œ Primary Mirror Aluminizing: on-board the telescope



Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Ouah... monstrueux... J'ai regarderses premières images... God damn !

[Ce message a été modifié par TéhO (Édité le 10-03-2008).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
'tain ils font des ces trucs les asrams maintenant !!!!

reste de la place pour la voiture dans le jardin ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Je remonte le topic deux ans après...
On ne peut pas dire que le LBT fasse beaucoup parler de lui, il semblerait que la mise au point ne soit toujours pas terminée...
Cependant une info est parue dans le dernier Science & vie (page 18) : un capteur CCD de 112 millions de pixels vient d'être specialement conçu pour le LBT et sera installé d'ici l'année prochaine.
http://www.bulletins-electroniques.com/actualites/62193.htm

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
J'imagine regarder dans la tête binoculaire d'un tel engin, m'ouarf ! Sont ils conçus d'ailleurs pour qu'on puisse regarder en "live" ou c'est simplement une cam derrière ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Bizare les supports des secondaires et tertiaires!?
ça doit générer aigrettes et obstruction, nan??

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Cette énorme paire de jumelles n'en finit pas d'être mise au point !!
Cette fois c'est l' optique adaptative qui vient de faire ses premiers essais, et visiblement les américains sont aux anges :
http://www.spacedaily.com/reports/Telescope_Achieves_Major_Breakthrough_ Using_Adaptive_Optics_999.html

Extrait :
« The LBT's adaptive optics system, called the First Light Adaptive Optics system (FLAO), immediately outperformed all other comparable systems, delivering an image quality greater than three times sharper than the Hubble Space Telescope using just one of the LBT's two 8.4 meter mirrors.
When the adaptive optics are in place for both mirrors and their light is combined appropriately, it is expected that the LBT will achieve image sharpness ten times that of the Hubble. »

Un press release sur l' A.O en question : http://medusa.as.arizona.edu/lbto//AO/AOpressrelease.htm

[Ce message a été modifié par jackbauer 2 (Édité le 19-06-2010).]

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Question toute bête : est ce qu'une optique adaptative n'a d'intérêt que dans le visible ? Qu'en est il des signaux IR UV ou même radios ?

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
l'image de la triple juste au dessus a du être réalisée en infrarouge.
l'optique adaptative est d'autant plus difficile à faire fonctionner que la longueur d'onde est courte. le visible est plus difficile que l'infrarouge et l'uv pour lequel je ne connais pas de manipe de ce genre, plus difficile que le visible.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this