NGC2237 Rosette Nebula

Field centered on R.A. 06h 30' & Dec. +05 00'

 

Would the Rosette Nebula by any other name look as sweet? The bland New General Catalog designation of NGC 2237 doesn't appear to diminish the appearance of the this flowery emission nebula. Inside the nebula lies an open cluster of bright young stars designated NGC 2244. These stars formed about four million years ago from the nebular material and their stellar winds are clearing a hole in the nebula's center, insulated by a layer of dust and hot gas. Ultraviolet light from the hot cluster stars causes the surrounding nebula to glow. The Rosette Nebula spans about 100 light-years across, lies about 5000 light-years away, and can be seen with a small telescope towards the constellation of Monoceros (text adapted from APOD).

Below is an enlargement of the image above, better showing some dark filaments of dust, sculpted by winds and radiation from hot, young stars. This image was taken with a almost full moon up in the sky.

 

Instrument:
CCD:
Exposition:
Filter:
Site:
Author:
Apo TEC140 (140/f7) + AP 900GTO SBIG STL11K, binning 1x1, T=-20°C Ha (180m) Optec Ha filter

Gambugliano, Vicenza, Italy

M.Lorenzi

 

 
 
 
 
 
 

 

All of the photographs and text on these pages are copyrighted by Marco Lorenzi. They may not be reproduced, published, copied or transmitted in any form, including electronically on the Internet or World Wide Web, without written permission of the author.